Sue Middleton's blog

Pride of Portland chorus has some costumes for sale (though note that the tops shown above have been sold)! We have the casual blue duster and lots of glass-beaded fringe remaining. All very reasonably priced!

For more information, click here for a PDF with all the details; you can also click on the photos below for a larger picture. Contact Julie Mikulic, Co-Team Leader of Pride of Portland Chorus with questions: julielmikulic@gmail.com / 503.997.9990.

One morning while reading a newspaper, Jarbas Agnelli saw a photograph of birds on an electric wire. He cut out the photo and was inspired to make a song using the exact location of the birds as musical notes. He was curious to hear what melody the birds created.

He sent the music to the photographer, Paulo Pinto; who told his editor at one of Brazil's largest newspapers, O Estado de Sau Paulo; who told a reporter; and, the story ended up as an interview in the newspaper. It ended up Winner of the YouTube Play Guggenheim Biennial Festival.

Visit YouTube to see how this enchanting photo plays out...literally! It's true that beautiful music is everywhere if we just know how to find it!

"One good thing about music, is when it hits you, you feel no pain."

Judging from the quote above, Bob Marley was part poet, part scientist. That's because there's truth to his head-bobbing lyrics from the song Trenchtown Rock. Research suggests that music not only helps us cope with pain — it can also benefit our physical and mental health in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how listening to tunes can ramp up your health. Read more here...

A composer by the name of Jim Wilson has recorded the sound of crickets and then slowed down the recording, revealing something so amazing: the crickets sound like they are singing the most beautiful chorus in perfect harmony. Though you may think it is human voices, everything you hear in this recording is in-fact crickets themselves!

As Pride of Portland members know, singing together can be an indescribable experience, uniting the chorus in a way that is somehow both exhilarating and calming. And now, scientists have discovered that singing with a group can actually slow down and synchronize the heartbeats of singers!

A team of Swedish researchers led by Björn Vickhoff discovered that this synchronicity can produce a sense of calm that is similar to the effects of yoga. To learn more, click here.